Participation at TRB Annual Meeting 2015

Following Dr. Stevanovic’s papers will be presented at the 94th TRB Annual Meeting:

  • Stevanovic, A.Z., Zlatkovic, M., Stevanovic, J., Kergaye, C., Ostojic, M., and Tasic, M. I. (2014). “Multimodal Traffic Control for Large Urban Networks with Special Priority for Light Rail Transit.”
  • Zlatkovic, M., Stevanovic, A.Z., Tasic, M. I., and Ostojic, M. (2014). “Multimodal Corridors Assessment with Transit Priority Enhancements: Case Study of the Future Airport Light Rail Line in Salt Lake City.”
  • So, J., Stevanovic, A.Z., and Koonce, P.J.V. (2014). “Estimating Performance of Traffic Signals based on Link travel Times.”

Dr. Stevanovic is also invited to present at two other workshops/meetings:

  • Stevanovic, A.Z. (2015). “Utilizing Connected-Vehicle-Like Data to Calibrate and Validate Microsimulation Models for Traffic Management Decision Support Systems.” SimSub Workshop: Using Simulation for Decision Support Systems: Past, Present, and Future.
  • Stevanovic, A.Z. (2015). “Traffic Signal Optimization based on Surrogate Safety.” TSSC Simulation Subcommittee AHB25(3) Meeting.

 

OLDER NEWS

October 2012 – NSF awards a Major Research Instrumentation grant to FAU to develop a vehicular networking testbed

Florida Atlantic University’s department of computer and electrical engineering and computer science professor Imad Mahgoub, Ph.D., has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) MRI: Development of Instrumentation to Support Multi-Technology Vehicular Networking Systems Research grant of $330,000 with a matching grant of $142,000 from FAU to develop a vehicular networking testbed and the software tools needed to quickly develop and deploy protocols and applications on the testbed.

Vehicular Networks also known as VANETs is a new technology that can provide quick, efficient means of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle to infrastructure communication such as cell phone towers. V2V communication enables a vehicle to: sense hazards with a 360 degree awareness of the position of other vehicles and the threat that their vehicle presents; calculate risk; issue driver advisories or warnings; or take pre-emptive actions to avoid a crash. The technology has tremendous potential to improve roadway safety, traffic flow efficiency and convenience for drivers and passengers and is part of an envisioned Intelligent Transportation System.

One of the main research challenges to improving this technology is the lack of accurate evaluation schemes. The current research relies heavily on simulation. As new vehicular networks are ready to be released the research team will work to develop a platform to verify the networks performance in real-life environments and identify unforeseen problems. The information gathered from this research will help match the capabilities of next–generation vehicles and enable easier evaluation of complex vehicular networking systems and create a higher standard in vehicular networking research world-wide.

The co-principal investigators of the study are Dr. Mohammad Ilyas, Interim Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Science and Dr. Aleksandar Stevanovic, Assistant professor of Civil, Environmental and Geomatics engineering.

Find more information here …

 

June 2012 – FAU Students Win Gold Coast ITE Scholarship Awards

Two FAU graduate students (in transportation engineering) won the Gold Coast ITE Spring 2012 Book Scholarship awards. Dusan Jolovic won the 1st prize for his paper on “Use of Microsimulation to Assess HCM 2010 Methodology for Oversaturated Freeway Weaving Segments” whereas Zahid Reza won the 2nd prize for his paper on “Impact of Queue Jumpers and Transit Signal Priority on Bus Rapid Transit”. Congratulations Dusan and Reza for your awards! It is great to see that you hard work paid off.

 

March 2012 – FDOT awards a contract to Dr. Stevanovic to research improvement of traffic signal operations in data-rich environment

A recent National Transportation Operations Coalition’s report estimates that drivers’ delays at traffic signals contribute 5 to 10 percent of all traffic delay or 295 million vehicle-hours of delay on major roadways alone. Florida Department of Transportation addresses delay at traffic signals mainly through its Transportation Systems Management and Operations (TSM&O) program whose role is to “optimize the performance of existing multimodal infrastructure through implementation of systems, services, and projects to preserve capacity and improve the security, safety and reliability of our transportation system.” As a part of this program FDOT District 4 has been deploying an Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS) infrastructure to support real-time traffic management and operations. For a regular driver in the Central Broward County this will mean less congestion or reduced delay, fewer stops, and more reliable travel times. The smart ATMS infrastructure will include Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) devices (hardware, software, and communications) such as Media Access Control (MAC) readers, Automatic Vehicle Identification (AVI) devices, and Microwave Vehicle Detection Systems (MVDS).

While these ATMS deployments will offer a data-rich environment that enables real-time monitoring of traffic conditions on arterial streets, it is not clear how these real-time performance measures can be used to improve traffic signal operations and overall driver’s travel experience. In order to investigate potential utilization of this real-time data-rich monitoring framework the FDOT awarded a contract to a FAU’s team lead by Dr. Stevanovic. More specifically, FAU’s team will investigate how to: 1. improve signal timings (e.g. green light coordination) on the arterial network and 2. inform travelers about current traffic conditions and better routing options (if any) in the case of incidents and severe traffic congestion on some parts of the network. The study will investigate traffic performance at around 200 signalized intersections in Central Broward County. A high-fidelity microsimulation model, representing field conditions, will be built with reporting capabilities mimicking those of newly installed ATMS devices. Then, a set of demand-based performance measures, and their thresholds, will be established to identify the best way to estimate real traffic demand based on multiple data collection sources (MAC readers, AVI devices, etc.). Finally, a set of practical strategies to develop optimal signal timings will be created to assist FDOT and BCTED in the process of managing traffic operations in the Central Broward.

 

October 2011 – Participation at TRB Annual Meeting 2012

Following Dr. Stevanovic’s papers are accepted for presentation at the 91st TRB Annual Meeting Conference:

  • Stevanovic, A.Z., Kergaye, C., and Stevanovic, J. (2012). “Long-Term Benefits of Adaptive Traffic Control under Varying Peak-hour Weekday Traffic Flows.”
  • Stevanovic, A.Z., Stevanovic, J., and Jolovic, D. (2012). “Retiming Traffic Signals to Minimize Surrogate Safety Measures on Signalized Road Networks.”
  • Stevanovic, A.Z., Kergaye, C., and Stevanovic, J. (2012). “Environmental Benefits of an Adaptive Traffic Control System: Assessment of Fuel Consumption and Vehicular Emissions.”
  • Mitrovic, N., Stevanovic, A.Z., and Jolovic, D. (2012). “Evaluating Traffic Impacts at LRT At-Grade Crossings using Schedule Design.”
  • Zlatkovic, M., Stevanovic, A.Z., Martin, P.T., and Tasic, I. (2012). “Evaluation of Transit Signal Priority Options for the Future 5600 W Bus Rapid Transit Line in West Valley City, UT.”
  • Zlatkovic, M., Stevanovic, A.Z., and Martin, P.T. (2012). “Development and Evaluation of an Algorithm for Resolving Conflicting Transit Signal Priority Calls.”

 

February 2011 – FAU Adaptive Traffic Control Laboratory gets a license to run SCATS – one of the World leading Adaptive Traffic Control Systems

FAU reached an agreement with Roads and Traffic Authority (of New South Wales, Australia) to use SCATSIM for its research and educational purposes. The SCATSIM software represents a computerized emulation of the real Adaptive Traffic Control System called SCATS (Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System), which is one of the leading brands of smart adaptive traffic control logics in the field. SCATSIM is a microsimulation package that uses SCATS to optimize the traffic signal operation of a network being simulated. Simulated detectors in a network model send traffic flow information to SCATS via WinTraff, which is an emulator of a bank of signal controllers. SCATS then optimizes signal timings and sends them back to the simulated network via WinTraff. By acquiring this software FAU Adaptive Traffic Control Laboratory will get a highly sophisticated educational and research tool that can be used to educate new generation of traffic engineers and transportation professionals.

 

October 2010 – Participation at TRB Annual Meeting 2011

Following Dr. Stevanovic’s papers are accepted for presentation at the 90th TRB Annual Meeting Conference:

  • Stevanovic, A.Z., Kergaye, C., and Stevanovic, J. (2011). “Long-Term Benefits of Adaptive Traffic Control under Varying Peak-hour Weekday Traffic Flows.”
  • Zlatkovic, M., Stevanovic, A.Z., Martin, P.T., and Tasic, I. (2011). “Evaluation of Transit Signal Priority Options for the Future 5600 W Bus Rapid Transit Line in West Valley City, UT.”
  • Zlatkovic, M., Stevanovic, A.Z., and Martin, P.T. (2011). “Development and Evaluation of an Algorithm for Resolving Conflicting Transit Signal Priority Calls.”

 

May 2010 – FAU Student Team Wins 2nd Place in FAA Design Competition for Universities

FAU team of five graduate students from Dr. Stevanovic’s Airport Planning & Design course wins the 2nd Place in the FAA Design Competition for Universities in the Airport Management and Planning Challenge. The team’s design titled “Improving Pedestrian and Traffic Flows to Accommodate Existing Environmental Requirements at Vero Beach General Aviation Airport” was reviewed by a panel of experts from FAA, industry and academia. The award is accompanied with a plaque for FAU and the cash prize of $1,500 to be equally divided by students. Our congratulations go to Team Members: Scott Parr, Steve Chery, Nikola Mitrovic, Claudia Olarte, Jeffrey Sanon and Yueqiong ZhaoCongratulations!!!

 

October 2009 – Participation at TRB Annual Meeting 2010

Following Dr. Stevanovic’s papers are accepted for presentation at the 89th TRB Annual Meeting Conference:

  • Mulandi, J., Stevanovic, A.Z., and Martin, P.T. (2010). “Cross-Evaluation of Signal Timing Optimized by Various Traffic Simulation and Signal Optimization Tools.”
  • Zlatkovic, M., Martin, P.T., and Stevanovic, A.Z. (2010). “Evaluation of Transit Signal Priority in RBC and ASC/3 Software-in-the-Loop Simulation Environment.”
  • Nadimpalli, B., Martin, P.T., Chaudhuri, P., and Stevanovic, A.Z. (2010). “Road User Impacts Due to Speed Limit Reduction in Work Zones Which Tool Is Best: QuickZone or VISUM?”
  • Farhan, M., Stevanovic, A.Z., and Martin, P.T. (2010). “A Practical Perspective on the Benefits of Combined Traffic Assignment and Control Method.”